Difference Between 7th And 8th Generation I7 Processors (Kaby Lake Vs Coffee Lake)

The 7th generation of the Intel i7 processors is now officially out, and it’s time to compare them with their 8th generation counterparts. The major Difference Between 7th And 8th Generation I7 Processors is in the number of cores available for each processor, as well as how many threads they can process at once. The newest models also have a much better base clock speed than their predecessors. If you’re interested in upgrading your old computer or buying one for the first time, this article will help you decide which type is right for you!

difference between 7th and 8th generation i7
difference between 7th and 8th generation i7

Official Names difference between 7th and 8th generation i7 Processors

7th generation i7 Processors called

The 7th generation of the i7 processors are often called “Kaby Lake” processors, and they were announced on January 3rd. The 8th generation was announced on August 21st, so they’re less than half a year apart in their release dates. Actually, due to how quickly technology advances these days, that’s actually a pretty long time.

8th generation i7 Processors called

The 8th generation of the Intel i7 processors are often called “Coffee Lake” processors, and they were announced on August 21st. The 7th generation was announced on January 3rd, so they’re over half a year apart in their release dates. Actually, due to how quickly technology advances these days, that’s actually a pretty long time.

Main differences between 7th and 8th generation i7 Processors

There are only four main differences between the 7th generation of the i7 processors and the 8th generation:

number of cores available

  • 7th generation: 4,
  • 8th generation: 6

The number of cores available is probably the biggest difference between these two generations. The 7th generation i7 processors have a maximum of four cores each, while the 8th generation have six cores each. This means you can have two 8th generation i7 processors in your computer and have twelve processing threads, instead of just four with the 7th generation! On the other hand, if you want to use older software that isn’t capable of utilizing all these extra cores, you’ll wind up being underutilized. The number of cores available may not matter so much if you only need the computer to do the jobs listed in this article , but it’s still important to keep in mind when choosing which one is right for you.

base clock speed

  • 7th generation: up to 3.5 GHz,
  • 8th generation: up to 4.0 GHz

The base clock speed is an interesting difference between these generations that most people won’t really notice. The 8th generation i7 processors have a base clock speed that’s around 100 MHz faster than the 7th generation. It might not sound like much, but this is actually enough to make the 8th generation 30% faster at tasks that can take advantage of all six cores. If you want your computer to be more responsive when doing things like streaming video and browsing the web, an 8th generation i7 processor would be much better.

hyperthreading enabled or not

  • 7th generation: yes,
  • 8th generation: no

If you’ve never heard of hyperthreading before, it’s a feature that allows your computer to process more tasks at once by fooling the software into thinking there are more cores available than there really are. However, since this is not something your average person will need, it only makes sense for the 8th generation i7 processors to not have this feature. It’s just another way of making computer programs work more efficiently without adding extra cores.

Whether or not the processor has an “i” designation at the end of its name

  • 7th generation: yes,
  • 8th generation: no

The last difference between these generations is whether or not they have an “i” designation at the end of their names, which refers to whether or not the processor has hyperthreading enabled. The 7th generation processors do have this designation, while the 8th generation do not. If you need your computer to use hyperthreading, then you’ll want a 7th generation i7 processor instead of an 8th generation one since it has that capability.

The biggest difference between the two generations is whether or not they have six cores. If you want a computer that will be more responsive and have the ability to do more at once, then an 8th generation i7 processor is better. However, if you don’t need a lot of processing power or your software isn’t capable of utilizing all those extra cores yet, then you’ll probably want a 7th generation one instead.

benefits of 7th vs 8th Generation Intel Core i7 Processor

If you’re looking for a way to make your computer faster, a 7th or even an 8th generation processor might be what you need. Here’s what both generations have to offer:

A 7th generation processor will usually give you two cores and four threads, which is great for running basic programs at once. The Intel Core i7 7700HQ is a good example of this kind of processor.

An 8th generation processor will give you the possibility to run all sorts of different programs at once without slowing down your computer too much. Additionally, they offer a faster processing speed and better graphics performance. You can find this kind of processor in the Intel Core i7 8750H.

Intel i7-7700K vs Intel i7-8700K: 7th and 8th generation i7 Processors

Here is an example from the 7th generation of intel i7-7700k and the 8th generation i7-8700K Processor.

One of the biggest differences between these two processors is that while they have a similar number of cores and threads, the newer model has a base clock speed that is more than 100 MHz faster. This can be pretty helpful if you’re a regular user, as it can make your computer feel snappier and respond to commands almost instantaneously.

Another difference is the quantity of RAM support. The 7700K has 16GB support, while the 8700K goes up to 64GB. This probably won’t matter much if you’re just a casual user, but if you’re editing videos or photos, you’ll definitely want the 8700K for its much higher capacity.

On the other hand, if you’re a gamer, you might not find much use in this upgrade. Although it’s technically newer, the 7700K outperforms the 8700K when it comes to gaming. Since most games aren’t using more than four cores at a time, you won’t really notice a difference in speed or responsiveness unless you have a high-end graphics card.

The other major difference between these two Intel i7 processors is that while the 7700K has a cooling fan included, the 8700K does not. If you’re buying your computer from a retailer, this might not be a big deal, but if you’re buying it second-hand this can save you money.

One of the biggest selling points for these processors is their unlocked multiplier. This allows you to change their clock speed, which is very important for overclockers. If overclocking isn’t your thing, it won’t matter much to you, but if you’re looking to get the most power out of your CPU, it’s a must.

Summary

In summary, if you’ve been using a computer with an i7-7700 or lower, upgrading to the i7-8700K will make a big difference in speed. This is especially true when it comes to 8th generation processors, but if you’re a casual user upgrading from an older generation, the boost in memory support might be enough to make up for it. If you want to use your computer more specifically for gaming or video editing, however, the 7700K is still a better choice for now.